The Pomodoro Technique For Single Focus!

The most effective way to measure how productive you've been throughout the day is to look back and see what you did regarding your most important tasks (MITS).

If you didn't get any of these completed, it's a clear sign you got distracted and lost focus. This was something in the late 1980s that university student Francesco Cirillo struggled with.

Cirillo found it difficult to complete assignments, and when he was feeling overwhelmed by it all, he asked himself to just commit to just 10 minutes of focused study time followed by short breaks in between.

He found a tomato (Pomodoro in Italian) shaped kitchen timer, set the time and noticed how this simple tool allowed him to be much productive. Hence the Pomodoro technique was created.

 

The biggest strength of this technique is that it allows for single focus, which is so important in today's world where distractions are ever-present. Here's how you can use it to your advantage:

Step 1: Pick the most urgent and important task, the one that has the highest consequences if you don't get it done.

Step 2: Set your timer for 25 minutes and focus on that single task until the timer rings. Take a 5-minute break and repeat.

After 4 Pomodoros (2 hours) take a longer break (15 – 20 minutes) and go back to work on your tasks until complete.

Although Cirillo recommends the 25 – 5-minute intervals, it doesn't have to be. Depending on your task, you might find 45 minute 5 intervals works best or some other ratio.

The time interval itself isn't the most impactful factor. It's the fact that the structure of it all narrows your focus to just a single task until it's complete.

And that technique is fantastic for building focus, but what if you are trying to wrap your head around a large project with multiple moving parts to it?

Next post I’ll tell you all about it.

Dominus Owen Markham

ESSENTIAL INCOME TOOLBOX

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